House of Hope is an orphanage giving a loving home to 50 needy children. It also runs a school 'Globalize Action Junior School' educating 250 children from the orphange and surrounding villages.

Tuesday, January 25, 2011

House of Hope Uganda

House of Hope school now known as Globalize Action Junior School.

House of Hope began in 2006 by Jenifer Tumwizere


Since the humble beginging of House of Hope it has grown both spiritually and physically.

The school began with classrooms built of sticks and mud and after a disasterous fire in 2008 these classrooms were rebuilt. The cause of this fire is still unknown even today.

A new block of 4 permanent classrooms have now been built along with a permanent girls dormitory and a permanent boys dormitory, a guesthouse house where the much needed volunteers who travel from various parts of the world to lend a helping hand are accomodated. The most recent building is a permanent kitchen where they cook for all 250 children and the staff.

Recent achievements that I managed to complete were:

Solar lighting to all of the buildings made possible by the Lions Club of Rockingham Western Australia.

A full set of current textbooks made possible by the Country Womens Association of Western Australia.

More mattresses and bedding so now they no longer need to share a bed. This was funded by the Rotary club of Palm Beach Western Australia.

A large donation of school stationery items were donated by Office National Rockingham Western Australia.

The installation of a deep water bore made possible by the generousity of a private company SBI, a large personal donation and donations from friends in Rockingham Western Australia.

I have just returned from my second visit to House of Hope Uganda. It was emotional inspiring and very rewarding. I can see progress with their education especially with English Maths and Science. A great effort giving each child more belief and confidence in themselves and hope for their future.

However I am sure by now you have all heard of the food crisis in the African continent. Uganda is not as widely affected as some countries but due to drought Uganda has not been able to plant its crops which would normally grow well in this country and now they also have huge shortages of food and what is availble has dramatically increased in cost. The staple grains have increased by 300% this leaves House of Hope in a real predicament and curently unable to buy food for the next month. They only have a maize porridge and posho and bean soup every day of the year! Imagine that! then think to yourself what it would be like to not even have these humble meals!

If you can spare a few dollars please consider a donation...... Thank you.

While I was there this time I began a building program to construct 2 of the 5 much needed permanent classrooms.

When I left Uganda these were up to roof level and I have since heard thtat the roof is now on and they will be completed by next week. These buildings have been designed with an additonal roof structure to give shelter form the sun and the rain (when they get rain) and make a covered area for the children to eat their meals.

I also took children to the hospital in Masaka for specialised medical treatment.

I played sport, soccer with the younger boys and netball with the girls. I took skipping rope for the younger girls.

I was very privileged to have the opportunity to join a team of volunteers and go to some remote islands on Lake Victoria to assist with testing for HIV. The results of the testing was higher than I had expected. Around 30%. All we could do was to offer advice and inform the people regarding the availability of further testing and medication.